Code Enforcement, please enforce the Las Vegas laws

By Sunny Day
Las Vegas Tribune

One would assume that after the wide open fiasco of the Alpine Hotel, the business license and code enforcement departments of the city of Las Vegas would be out enforcing the law, but it does not seem to be that way.
The car sales on Lilliput Lane continue making sales without paying for their business license or paying their just revenue money to the coffers of Las Vegas; just last weekend there were seven cars parked on the street waiting to be sold.

West Sirius Avenue between Arville and Warnock Avenue, in the shadow
of Cashman Middle School, eighteen-wheelers parked openly

West Sirius Avenue between Arville and Warnock Avenue, in the shadow of Cashman Middle School, eighteen-wheelers parked openly with disregard for the safety of the residents of several apartment buildings and the middle school. Children in that area may be exposed to rats and other health-threatening rodents or such brought in by those drivers ignoring code enforcement.
The car wash business on West Sirius Avenue between Arville and Warnock Avenue is booming, perhaps with the blessing of code enforcement agents.
Just last weekend five car wash vans were openly servicing nine cars in that location; again, most likely with the blessing of code enforcement that allegedly is not working on the weekends.

The car wash business on West Sirius Avenue between Arville and Warnock Avenue is booming, perhaps with the blessing of code enforcement agents.

Not all those car-wash vans with the name of their business labeled on the side of the vans have Nevada license plates, indicating that they are not registered residents of the city.
So many Chiefs and no Indians (no racial intention) making it impossible for regular citizens to learn or know where to go and where to file complaints following the “see something, say something” suggestion from law enforcement agencies and city and county personnel.
Some weeks ago we counted ninety-two California plates in the area of Decatur Boulevard between Desert Inn Road and Meadows Mall, all in the city of Las Vegas.
Most likely not all of those ninety-two cars were tourists; they may be working in the area, conducting business without a license and driving without changing their license plates; not only would doing the right thing improve the coffers of the State of Nevada, but also following the law requires new residents to turn in their other state plates within thirty days.
The law requires that when a person moves to another state they have to obtain a new driver’s license, re-register their vehicle with that state, prove again that they have insurance and turn in their old license plates to the new state’s DMV office after which they will be issued new plates for their car or other vehicles.
Where should these concerned citizens direct their “say something” when they “see something”? To code enforcement? “Parking services”? “Parking enforcement” agencies seem like they all provide the same services: NONE!
The question could be: Why has Nevada allowed so many people from other states to abuse our welcome to Las Vegas’ hospitality?
The Alpine Hotel tragedy just before Christmas last year seems to have caused no impact on those dedicated code enforcement agents.
Have a sunny day!

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments