The debate of the hopefuls: May the best candidate win

July 30, 2019 - Detroit, Michigan, United States: CNN Democratic Presidential Debate Detroit, Michigan 2019. L to R: Candidate author Marianne Williamson, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, Minnesota US Sen. Amy Klobuchar South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Vermont US Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts US Sen. Elizabeth Warren, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock. (John Nowak / CNN / Polaris)
CNN Democratic Presidential Debate Detroit, Michigan 2019. L to R: Candidate author Marianne Williamson, Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan, Minnesota US Sen. Amy Klobuchar South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Vermont US Sen. Bernie Sanders, Massachusetts US Sen. Elizabeth Warren, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock. (John Nowak / CNN / Polaris)

Well, we can’t complain about the number of Democratic candidates vying for the top position in this United States of America. After all, back in 2016, the number of Republican candidates was all the talk. We have always said to any group of contenders, “May the best man win.” We will need to change the wording to bring us up to date to reflect the place of women in practically any race, in politics or not. It could be “May the best person win,” “May the best candidate win,” or even “May the best contender win.” Fortunately, we are that kind of country. If we don’t like how our government is being run, then we wait for the next election and vote the politicians we don’t like OUT and vote the politicians we think will do a better job IN.
In addition, we are free to encourage those we think would do a good job to “apply” for that position. Chances are most people don’t think of the position of President of the United States of America as a job that one must apply for. And they don’t realize that those applicants for the job must be interviewed by every voter watching those debates.
While we, the voters, don’t personally get to ask the questions, the moderators do that for us. And whether or not they ask the questions we would have chosen to ask, we get to not only hear their responses but see their mannerisms and how they conduct themselves not only in responding but in their interactions with the other candidates.
While one of those Democratic applicants for the job of president has to win out over the others, if we’ve already made up our mind to vote Republican, chances are that none of them will be appealing. However, on the outside chance that you’re looking them over with a serious eye, we hope that you’ll be paying close attention to everything they say. Does it sound logical, realistic, and doable, and does the candidate saying it sound sincere and believable? Or might it sound like the same old pablum, served up with additional details and in a different accent? Or worse yet, does it sound like most, if not all of the candidates are giving away the store? No matter how appealing it might sound to get this, that, or the other thing for free, we must always remember that whatever is offered, it must be paid for from some source.
However, for just a moment, let’s assume that every candidate is totally sincere and totally believable. Let’s even imagine that most of them are likable as they present themselves on stage. See if you can imagine each one as president. Do you feel something is missing?
Do you feel they have command of the stage when they speak? Do their promises sound logical, even if they could somehow come to fruition?
Or in comparison with other candidates’ promises of the past, do they sound more like fluffed-up and stretched out false promises that would never even be mentioned except to win points in a presidential campaign?
While the thing we find most disturbing is something that practically all candidates are guilty of — Republican or Democrat alike — and happens every time (you would think they would catch on, see how bad it looks, and practice working on it for their own presentations).
That is the most annoying practice of trying in to get in as much more as they can after they are told their time is up. Not only is that cutting into the next candidate’s time, but all the while the candidate is trying to finish up his or her point, the moderator is reminding them that their time is up, so it’s just like the annoying habit of talking over each other. One or the other candidate may have something worth listening to, but both of their messages get lost in
the overtalking. And to add to the fact of the wasted time and lost messages, they both end up appearing like egomaniacs who each think that what they have to say is more important than the other.
But no matter how the candidates may appear, we are so glad we live in a country where those of us who are basically qualified have the opportunity to apply for that amazing job of president. So whether it’s two or twenty-two candidates, we the voters have the important responsibility to listen to all the applicants for that job and pick
the candidate we believe would be best for the position. Sometimes it’s easy. Sometimes it’s not. But since they all can’t be chosen for that one and only job of its kind, as we sort through their qualifications and evaluate all their presidential qualities, we need to early on eliminate those who just wouldn’t make the grade.
May the best candidate win!

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