Newspaper puts City of Las Vegas on notice

By Rafael R. Estevez
De Oro Media Group
The owners of the Las Vegas Tribune newspaper are meeting with some legal advisers to discuss the format of a letter that will be sent to the city business license, code enforcement departments, and the entire city council, alerting all of them of the newspaper’s intention of no longer paying for the business license.
The owners of the twenty-one-year-old weekly newspaper believe that if residents in the area of Ward One can open, run, and operate their businesses without applying for and paying for their business licenses, it is not fair that others have to pay for their own business licenses.
When asked if that will be a final decision, Perly Viasmensky, the newspaper’s general manager stated, “Not necessarily,” explaining that there are two options, “either those people stop operating without a license with the blessing of city officials or another option is that we start operating the newspaper from my house in Ward One,” said Viasmensky.
The newspaper believes that the “no so clandestine mechanical operation” needs to be stopped by the city due to the fact that the mechanic has been moving operation to different homes in the block and it is impossible to know who is fixing their own cars unless the “mechanic” shows his face to know that he has moved the shop around.
Up to now, the mechanic has been operating with the blessings of code enforcement agents in the area; Tony Rogers first and Lisa Hartman thereafter, who claimed that the mechanic told her that all the cars were his cars.
If all these cars are “his cars” he must be renting or leasing these cars because they all come and later leave the area; some of these cars come many times after, giving the impression that he is either a bad mechanic and does not fix them as expected or he may break something else so they have to come back at a later time.
Viasmensky stated that she will not clean her back yard or fix the front yard until the area is cleaned of commercial operations. “I moved to a residential area that was not classified as a ghetto, but that it is where I live now — in a ghetto,” stated the newspaper manager.
The newspaper was founded twenty-one years ago by the Larraz brothers after they closed down La Verdad, the first Spanish newspaper in the state of Nevada, founding the weekly publication known as “the Downtown newspaper” fighting for the right of the people supporting the mayoral campaign of Oscar Goodman and defending Mayor Oscar Goodman from day one from the Jon Ralstons of those days when they were not a “nonprofit” and did not have to report astronomical amounts of donations.

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