More horror stories about the Valley Health System

More horror stories about the Valley Health System

By Perly Viasemsky

Las Vegas Tribune

Summerlin Hospital Medical Center, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, is a member of the Valley Health System, and it is a sister facility with Valley Hospital Medical Center, Desert Springs Hospital Medical Center, Spring Valley Hospital Medical Center, and Centennial Hills Hospital Medical Center. The mission of Summerlin Hospital Medical Center is long-term growth through quality healthcare services for patients, physicians, friends, family, and employees of the medical center. With 454 private room beds on its 40-acre campus, Summerlin Hospital Medical Center has almost 300 physicians on-site in 30 areas of care, and employs a total of 1,100 non-physician employees and 1,400 physicians on staff. As an employer, Summerlin Hospital Medical Center seeks people who share its same values of superior service, quality, career development, fair treatment, teamwork, compassion, and innovation. In the past, Summerlin Hospital Medical Center has offered full-time and part-time opportunities for job seekers.

I personally have the worst opinion of Valley Hospital and its personnel, especially its nurses employed by the company. Many people mistakenly believe that Summerlin will be better because it is located in the refined area of “Summerlin.”

I have news for you… I have just received a complaint from a lady whose husband was hospitalized at the one and only “Summerlin Hospital and Medical Center.” One early morning in April 2021 she received a call from the hospital saying, “I’m sorry for your loss, your husband has passed away.

The man requested to go to the bathroom, the nurse left him there unattended. That nurse went… only God knows where… instead of staying near the patient she was supposed to care for, and when she returned several minutes later, she found the man dropped on his belly, already dead. They claimed to the widow that they tried to revive him, but when she went to the hospital, she found him in bed, with a very clean sheet from his chest down, without any sign that they had tried to revive him, not even a sign of any automated external defibrillator.

There was not even a “provider” to greet the widow and give an explanation of his sudden death. Only nurses take responsibility.

Another case regarding Centennial Hill Hospital Center. A man who, after surgery, was in terrible pain. He begged for some kind of relief. What did the nurse in charge do? She tied both of his hands to the bed like an animal.

Valley Hospital is no different; when the next of kin called the hospital requesting information on the health status of their loved one, the nurse had the audacity to put that person on hold for almost ten minutes. The person called back and the “provider” on duty came to the phone to say: “We are losing him; we are trying to keep him alive. If you want to see him alive, you have exactly 20 minutes to get to the hospital.”

The person goes through traffic, trying to get to the hospital within that 20-minute time frame only to find that the loved one is already deceased. There was no effort to keep him alive. There was a clean sheet over his chest and he was already cold, cold to the touch. Meaning that the “provider” lied to the family member.

These are only three cases under the umbrella of the Valley Health System, but there are many others that I am willing to disclose in the near future.

If the Nevada State Board of Medical Examiners is afraid to investigate Valley Health System because “money talks and the rest walks,” we are going to disclose closed cases until someone is aware of the corruption of Valley Health System.

* * * * *

Perly Viasmensky is the General Manager of the Las Vegas Tribune. She writes a weekly column in this newspaper. To contact Perly Viasmensky, email her at pviasmensky@lasvegastribune.com.

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