Above all, Judge Andress-Tobiasson is as good a Judge as she is a mother

Judge Melanie Andress Tobiasson

By Rolando Larraz
Las Vegas Tribune

Judge Melanie Andress Tobiasson

Almost every attorney that we saw in the Regional Justice Center was upset with Judge Melanie Andress-Tobiasson’s decision of resigning the position that the voters of Southern Nevada elected her to; all of them without hesitation stated that Judge Andress-Tobiasson is a good judge, a fair judge, one of a kind, and they’ll hate to see her leave the bench.
It is the Las Vegas Tribune’s fault that we are not able to name those attorneys; because we’re well aware how vindictive Clark County prosecutors and the administration of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department are, we opted to not mention any names to avoid any retaliation against all those attorneys.
However, what these attorneys may not be aware of is that the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline, through its General Counsel and Executive Director, Paul C Deyhle, Nevada Bar Number 6954, most likely following orders from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Sheriff Joe Lombardo and its Vice Unit, has subpoenaed Judge Melanie Andress-Tobiasson’s daughter to testify against her own mother. How low can one get!?!
But Judge Melanie Andress-Tobiasson was a mother before she even was elected to the bench and she did not want to put her daughter in that position; her daughter had already experienced the reality and cruelty of life and she was not going to add more stress to her child because regardless of the child’s age, for a mother, her child always comes first and most likely those police officers whose daughters experienced the same situation may be quietly admiring the judge fordoing what they would never be able to do if they wanted to avoid any internal reprisal from the Vice Unit, the Sheriff and the District Attorney, Steve Wolfson.
Judge Andress-Tobiasson was elected to the bench; the citizens of Clark County elected her to that position and not the Nevada Commission on Judicial Discipline, or his Executive Director, Paul C Deyhle, District Attorney Steve Wolfson, or Sheriff Joe Lombardo, and none of them should have forced her to resign. If they wanted her out of office they could have recalled her, but not necessarily fired her; what they did by forcing her to resign was technically the same thing their co-conspirator, former District Attorney David Roger, did with former County Recorder, Fran Dean, a few years back.
The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department is well known for its dirty work and its abuse of power among its plainclothes units leading
to that oft heard comment spoken by visitors about “coming to Las Vegas on vacation and leaving on probation.”
Reading one of the articles by David Ferrara in the daily newspaper about those two police detectives being indicted bring back memories
of the corruption in some of the units of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.
Chief Deputy District Attorney Christopher Hammer may be a very young man or he may have started working with the Clark County District
Attorney only yesterday for him to tell the daily newspaper’s David Ferrara “this is probably the worst public corruption case involving police officers since I have been in office.”
Back in the early eighties, a newspaperman was visiting the old Organized Crime Unit; a detective was walking to the evidence vault when another detective yelled out, “If you’re looking for the evidence, do not waste your time; I already took it.”
The detective took the drugs for his girlfriend; he was arresting people with drugs and letting them go after he took the drugs and brought them home to his girlfriend.
The reporter, the late Ned Day, with the now defunct North Las Vegas Valley Times, reported the “incident” — after a thorough digging — in
the next edition of his newspaper.
It was a 1993 summer when the Utah Federal Bureau of Investigation team arrested the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Detective
Rod Mathis in Las Vegas for taking bribes; he was sentenced to eighteen months in a federal country club camp.
In 1996, a Registered Narcotic Informant was murdered in Alamo, Nevada after some Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department police officers
assigned to the narcotics unit “accidentally” allowed drug dealers to learn the identity of the Registered Narcotic Informant.
In 1997, two police officers, Chris Brady and Ron Mortensen, from the old, now defunct Southwest substation, were involved in the killing of
a low-level narcotics suspect and well-known gang member named Daniel Mendoza. Neither police officer, Brady nor Mortensen, was assigned to the Narcotics Unit, but Daniel Mendoza was a small street drug dealer known to Chris Brady and it was Brady’s idea to pass by the area where
Mendoza resided, and it was Brady who shot Mendoza.
Brady’s father, an old-timer and notorious police detective with a reputation of knowing where the bodies are buried and holding secrets from many high-ranking police department officers, manipulated the system, bringing up the obvious false arrest and unsubstantiated conviction of Ron Mortensen while his son only did a few months in a federal country club camp for charges unrelated to the prolific use and sales of narcotics and wife beatings and the subsequent cover-ups by LVMPD supervisory personnel; or maybe the obvious segregated disregard of formal internal affairs complaints, five of which have been submitted and resubmitted several times.
In 1998 there was the cover-up of the four LVMPD police officers who raped a narcotics suspect’s girlfriend and were only let go from employment for that deed, with no criminal charges.
In 2010 a cover-up of the fatal shooting of a small street drug pusher, Travon Cole, took place after a Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department narcotics officer entered his residence and shot him to death.
Let’s not forget the use of phony drug dogs by the LVMPD, DEA, Nevada Drug Interdiction, and the Nevada Highway Patrol (NHP), for which
there was a class action lawsuit that lasted several years, or maybe the systematic protection of certain mid-level supervisors who have lied under oath in order to further their unlawful and unholy agenda.
Detective Lawrence Rinetti with Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Narcotics Unit was charged with more than three dozen felonies and gross misdemeanors, including trafficking in a controlled substance, misconduct of a public officer, conspiracy, offering a false instrument for filing or record and fraudulent use of a credit card; Michael Ramirez, the head of the governmental affairs for the Las Vegas Police Protective Association, AKA PPA, faces one count each of conspiracy to commit a crime and offering a false instrument for filing or record according to David Ferrara’s article in the daily newspaper.
Back in 1979 on a Sunday, the plainclothes detectives with the Organized Crime Unit invaded the offices of the then only Spanish Newspaper in Nevada, La Verdad, and the only bi-lingual answering service in Nevada, kicking doors down — and when the telephone operator on duty tried to call yours truly, her boss, she was beat up by a cowardly plainclothes police detective who never had the manhood to wait for a man to arrive at the building; simultaneously, the same day, other plainclothes detectives were raiding the Stardust Hotel, the Sporting House, Tony Spilotro’s Jewelry shop on West Sahara Boulevard and Joey Cusumano’s car dealership.
The La Verdad Spanish Newspaper was the only small business raided that day and as far as we know was the only place that a female was
mistreated, giving the impression that these macho men with badges and guns did not have what it takes to abuse women in these other places;
La Verdad Newspaper was the only business raided that was not tied to any organized crime family.
Business as usual within Metro’s jurisdiction.

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